Coup – Brown: “Nuffink to do wiv me, Guv”

Or, as translated from one colloquial to another:

brownthumbnail_7sep06coup.jpg

“Whit, ME? Ah didnae dae it!

Honest, constable.

Never touched ‘im!

Goat any proof?

That’s no’ ma knife, by the way, by the way!”

Comment at end

10th September, 2006

BROWN TO THE RESCUE – NOT

The Chancellor of the Exchequer, Gordon Brown, has come out of the closet, at LAST!

No, not to rescue the country’s Prime Minister from the self-destructive tendencies of their party, and to declare that Mr Blair should remain as leader and prime minister for the “full third term” promised by Blair, but to back what the PM has been forced to say about his departure. In other words, now that Mr Blair has been successfully removed, even if it takes some time to carry him out of Downing Street, he who will be obeyed (the guy … knifer next door), has spoken! Hear and watch him here, if you must.

I hang on your every word, chancellor, as should you!

tblaircoup.jpg

Robert Harris in the Times says:

‘Autistic’ Brown loses the plot

A true statesman would have praised his departing master to the rooftops, but not Gordon, says Robert Harris.

Excerpt:

‘Now that relationship, the axis around which British politics has turned for more than a decade, is finished, for ever. At the beginning of the week it looked as though the biggest loser of their bitter public separation was Blair. But by the end of the week there can be no doubt that the real casualty is Brown. Blair’s time at the top was almost over, whatever happened: he has nothing to lose now except his dignity, which in any case is a commodity always in short supply in politics. Brown, on the other hand, desperately needs to inherit the goodwill of a unified party if he is to have any hope of winning the next election.

This is why his behaviour has been little short of insane. We shall no doubt have to await the memoirs of the two men before we can properly reconstruct the cataclysmic meeting which took place on Wednesday. But, however one analyses it, it is clearly Brown who was ranting and demented. At one point he apparently threatened Blair with a second, third and even a fourth “wave” of resignations, for all the world like Osama Bin Laden ordering up cells of suicide bombers from his cave in Tora Bora. It is a measure of Blair’s enfeeblement that he did not simply sack him on the spot, tell him to go to hell and challenge him for the leadership if he dared.

Presumably Brown was gambling that none of this would ever emerge. Here again one sees his autism when it comes to personal relations. News of what had happened was spreading across London within hours, as it was bound to do. It is therefore not his brutality which makes one question Brown’s fitness to become prime minister — brutality can be a necessary quality in a leader — it is his criminal stupidity. And if this is the way he behaves towards the serving prime minister, can one wonder that so many of his junior colleagues, such as Charles Clarke, feel so scarred by their dealings with him, or view the prospect of a Brown premiership with trepidation?

What Brown needed to do this autumn was to treat Blair with the utmost loyalty and consideration, both in public and private.

[…]

And this — this! — is the moment when Brown has chosen to plunge the knife into Blair. A brilliant man, yes, but a flawed one and a strange one and perhaps worst of all — an unlucky one.’

……………………………………………………………………………..

In full: Gordon Brown statement, Thursday 7th September, 2006, 14:54

This is the statement by Chancellor Gordon Brown regarding the future of Prime Minister Tony Blair:

We are in the unique situation in our country where the Prime Minister has said, as he has said on a number of occasions, that he does not want to lead our party and our government into the next general election.

As a result of that, there are questions about what happens in the time to come, and it’s right to say that I, like others, have had questions myself.

But I want to make it absolutely clear today, that when I met the prime minister yesterday, I said to him – as I’ve said on many occasions and I repeat today – it is for him to make the decision.

I said also to him, and I make it clear again today, that I will support him in the decision he makes, that this cannot and should not be about private arrangements but what is in the best interests of our party, and most of all the best interests of our country – and I will support him in doing exactly that.

Tony Blair and I have worked together for 20 years and we have done so in difficult times as well as in very good times.

We continue to work together because we share a determination, both of us, that we will advance and get down to the business of the Labour government, and doing our best by the people of the country.

I am determined that in the months and years to come we continue to do our duty by the people of Britain – and it is my determination and his to do that – that will influence everything that happens in the time to come.

Read this Guardian report.

……………………………………………………………………………..

Blair statement in full

Blair – “I will go within a year” – Brown: “not good enough”

……………………………………………………………………………..

This anaylsis of the political assassination, by Daniel Finkelstein is right on the ball

‘Let’s leave Tony Blair’s statement to one side for a moment and concentrate on Gordon Brown’s.

The Chancellor has mounted a coup against a serving Prime Minister, and a successful coup at that. He owes the public an explanation for his behaviour. Instead he gave us this.

Let’s take Mr Brown’s statement paragraph by paragraph (a process that in the blogging world has become known as Fisking):

We are in the unique situation in our country where the Prime Minister has said, as he has said on a number of occasions, that he does not want to lead our party and our Government into the next general election.

Who knows whether the Prime Minister wanted to lead the party into the next election. Mr Brown’s persistent campaign made it impossible for him to ignore speculation any more.

But if Mr Brown is going to make a virtue out of Mr Blair’s stated desire to leave office before the next election, he ought to point out that the Prime Minister also pledged to stay through the whole Parliament.

As Matthew D’Ancona points out in his Spectator account, Mr Blair said in the October before the election: “There have been all these stories rolling round that maybe I might stand for election, but stand down in year one, year two. I’m not going to do that.” Mr Brown has not, therefore, supported the statement that the Prime Minister made before the election, he has forced Mr Blair to abandon that statement.

As a result of that, there are questions about what happens in the time to come, and it’s right to say that I, like others, have had questions myself.

This is a ludicrous way for Mr Brown to describe his behaviour. He clearly thinks we are all fools.

But I want to make it absolutely clear today, that when I met the Prime Minister yesterday, I said to him – as I’ve said on many occasions and I repeat today – it is for him to make the decision.

Given that the meetings took several hours, involved a great deal of shouting and ended in deadlock, this assertion of Mr Brown’s is, ahem, surprising. Perhaps what the Chancellor meant is that “on several occasions I shouted at him ‘well it’s up to you, sunshine’.”

I said also to him, and I make it clear again today, that I will support him in the decision he makes, that this cannot and should not be about private arrangements but what is in the best interests of our party, and most of all the best interests of our country – and I will support him in doing exactly that.

This is entirely, almost embarrassingly, untrue. Mr Brown was only willing to support Mr Blair’s decision once Mr Blair agreed to do what the Chancellor wanted him to. Indeed the Prime Minister himself said later that he hadn’t wanted to make the announcement he made. Mr Brown’s reluctance to support Mr Blair’s original decision that he would not set a date was the foundation of the entire crisis. And the idea that it is not about private arrangements is also an insultingly obvious untruth.

Tony Blair and I have worked together for 20 years and we have done so in difficult times as well as in very good times.

Yeah, yeah, get on with it.

We continue to work together because we share a determination, both of us, that we will advance and get down to the business of the Labour Government, and doing our best by the people of the country.

Sharing a determination to get on with the business of government isn’t sharing much is it? He didn’t say they shared values, policies, approaches to government. I suppose if they did then there would be no need for Labour to replace Mr Blair with Mr Brown, now would there?

I am determined that in the months and years to come we continue to do our duty by the people of Britain – and it is my determination and his to do that – that will influence everything that happens in the time to come.

It is his determination to be Prime Minister that has influenced everything. “Continue to do our duty by the people of Britain”? Do me a lemon.’




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7 Responses to “Coup – Brown: “Nuffink to do wiv me, Guv””

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    […] Tony Blair. See Mandelson’s accusations over the coup against Blair coup in 2006. [A touch of not me, Guvvery?] Now, where  have we heard that before, in Scots […]

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